FAQ

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FAQ

faq

general

does dr.champion have my records?

There have been a few patient records which Dr. Champion has already received from her previous locations. However, we are asking the majority of patients to complete a release form so our office may professionally request your records. (Click here for Records Release Form.
Patients may also access their own records via the prior office’s portal system. This has proven to be a more direct and efficient way. Reach out to Dr. Champion’s staff if you need assistance with this method. Receiving prior records is beneficial for your appointment but it is NOT a requirement. We want to address your eye care needs, regardless of record status.

does the new office accept my  insurance?

Champion Eye Care accepts assignment with Medicare and secondary plans. We also participate with many major insurance providers, including: All Blue Cross Blue Shield PPO and HMO
  • All Cigna PPO and HMO
  • Aetna
  • Medicare Part B
  • Tricare for Life
  • Tricare Select PPO
  • United Health Care
  • Wellmed Medicare HMO
Our office is working tirelessly to become in-network with all carriers. If you have questions about a particular insurance not listed here, please contact us.

Is Dr Champion the only doctor at the practice?

It is solely Dr. Champion at this time, but we hope to keep growing and add further staff to optimize all your eye care needs! Please check back for any updates.

faq

eye  conditions

Why Is Dry Eye So Difficult to Treat?

Many people living with dry eye feel misunderstood and unsatisfied with their treatment, according to a new survey. Health Union interviewed 415 Americans with chronic dry eye about their experience managing the condition. Here’s what the survey found, and what ophthalmologists say could help.

The most frustrating thing about dry eye is ...

 

Difficulty finding relief from dry eye symptoms

  • Almost half (48%) of patients with dry eye said they followed their treatment plan carefully, but only 13% experienced lasting relief
  • Most people say that over-the-counter eye drops alone do not provide sufficient relief, and seek out additional treatments
  • Home remedies include drinking additional water throughout the day (reported by 76% of survey respondents), using a warm compress (56%), blinking often (52%), avoiding cigarettes and secondhand smoke (45%) and thoroughly removing eye makeup (34%)

Frustration with how dry eye is diagnosed or perceived

  • Between a quarter and a third of people say that their condition has been written off as an “old person’s disease” or attributed to something less severe such as allergies
  • Nearly half of people feel others don’t understand what they’re going through or appreciate the reality of their discomfort

Struggling with the debilitating symptoms of dry eye

  • Many people struggle with multiple symptoms such as dryness (76%), foreign body sensation (64%), eye fatigue (62%), light sensitivity (62%) and blurred vision (60%), as well as burning, scratchiness and itchiness
  • Dry eye interferes with many aspects of everyday life, including driving at night (56%), reading (42%), using a computer (34%) and watching television (24%)

Experts say dry eye is often mistaken for other conditions

Dry eye is one type of ocular surface disease, a group of disorders that causes the eyes to not produce enough tears or the right quality of tears. Tears are essential for keeping your eyes healthy and comfortable. “Ocular surface disease is very complex with many subtypes and overlapping symptoms. Getting to a correct diagnosis requires expertise and can take time,” says dry eye expert Christopher Starr, MD, an associate professor of ophthalmology at Weill Cornell Medical Center. “A lot of symptoms are labeled and treated as dry eye, but patients may not be getting better because there are other things going on” he says. Allergic conjunctivitis, blepharitis, meibomian gland dysfunction, floppy eyelid syndrome, corneal dystrophies and toxicity to medications or cosmetics are just a handful of the many conditions that can be incorrectly referred to as dry eye disease, Starr says. While artificial tears can provide temporary relief in many of these cases, they don’t treat the underlying causes.

Here are the best tools and tests for diagnosing dry eye

“People who are feeling frustrated should not give up. There are a growing number of diagnostic tools to pinpoint the root problems and an expanding number of treatments to address them,” Starr says. Eye doctors may also use other tests that measure the quality of tears. They may also perform imaging tests to look for problems with the meibomian glands, which produce an oil found in healthy tears.

Treating dry eye is tricky, but not impossible

There are many treatment options today and finding a solution may involve some trial and error. Many people find it necessary to combine therapies and make a few lifestyle changes. The right treatment regimen can involve a lot of daily maintenance.

Your eye doctor may suggest:

  • Lifestyle, environmental and dietary changes
  • Punctal plugs
  • Topical medications or pills that prevent inflammation and infection
  • FDA-approved drugs such as Restasis, Xiidra, Cequa or Eyesuvis
  • Devices such as LipiFlow, TearCare, Blephex and/or specialty contact lenses

What Is Macular Degeneration?

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a problem with your retina. It happens when a part of the retina called the macula is damaged. In this article: With AMD you lose your central vision. You cannot see fine details, whether you are looking at something close or far. But your peripheral (side) vision will still be normal. For instance, imagine you are looking at a clock with hands. With AMD, you might see the clock’s numbers but not the hands. AMD is very common. It is a leading cause of vision loss in people 50 years or older.

Two types of AMD
 

Dry AMD

This form is quite common. About 80% (8 out of 10) of people who have AMD have the dry form. Dry AMD is when parts of the macula get thinner with age and tiny clumps of protein called drusen grow. You slowly lose central vision. There is no way to treat dry AMD yet.

Wet AMD

This form is less common but much more serious. Wet AMD is when new, abnormal blood vessels grow under the retina. These vessels may leak blood or other fluids, causing scarring of the macula. You lose vision faster with wet AMD than with dry AMD. Many people don’t realize they have AMD until their vision is very blurry. This is why it is important to have regular visits to an ophthalmologist. He or she can look for early signs of AMD before you have any vision problems.

Who Is at Risk for AMD?

You are more likely to develop AMD if you:

  • have a family history of AMD
  • smoke cigarettes
  • are white
  • eat a diet high in saturated fat (found in foods like meat, butter, and cheese)
  • are overweight
  • have hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • are over 50 years old

Having heart disease is another risk factor for AMD, as is having high cholesterol levels.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration Diagnosis

During an eye exam, your ophthalmologist may ask you to look at an Amsler grid. This grid helps you notice any blurry, distorted, or blank spots in your field of vision. Your ophthalmologist will also look inside your eye through a special lens. He or she can see if there are changes in the retina and macula. Your ophthalmologist will put dilating eye drops in your eye to widen your pupil. This allows him or her to look through a special lens at the inside of your eye. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is another way to look closely at the retina. A machine scans the retina and provides very detailed images of the retina and macula. Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is another way to look closely at the blood vessels in and under the retina. This is like fluorescein angiography but does not use a dye.

Age-Related Macular Degeneration Treatment

Dry AMD treatment

Right now, there is no way to treat the dry form of AMD. However certain people with lots of drusen or serious vision loss might benefit from taking a certain combination of nutritional supplements. A large study (AREDS and the later AREDS 2 study) found those people may slow their dry AMD by taking these vitamins and minerals daily:

  • Vitamin C (500 mg)
  • Vitamin E (400 IU)
  • Lutein (10 mg)
  • Zeaxanthin (2 mg)
  • Zinc (80 mg)
  • Copper (2 mg)

Your ophthalmologist can tell you if vitamins and minerals are recommended for your dry AMD, as not all forms will benefit from the AREDS supplements. Beta carotene should not be used by smokers as it raises the risk of lung cancer.

Eye-healthy foods

Dark leafy greens, yellow fruits and vegetables, fish, and a balanced, nutrient-rich diet have been shown beneficial for people with AMD.

Wet AMD treatment

To help treat wet AMD, there are medications called anti-VEGF drugs. Anti-VEGF treatment helps reduce the number of abnormal blood vessels in your retina. It also slows any leaking from blood vessels. This medicine is delivered to your eye through a very slender needle.

Making the Most of the Vision You Have

If you have AMD, you can learn how to make the most of your vision. Often you can still do many of your favorite things with special low vision tools. These can include different kinds of magnifying tools, handheld computers, electronic items and more. Also, you can learn how to use your side vision to help you do things. A vision rehabilitation specialist can teach you how this works. They also can help you find many low vision support services and tools. Ask your ophthalmologist to help you find a vision rehabilitation specialist in your area. The goal is to learn new ways to be as independent as possible.

Test Your Vision with the Amsler Grid

AMD causes your vision to change over time. You may not notice these changes when they happen. But you need to catch vision changes as soon as possible. Treating them early can help slow or stop further loss of sight. You should use an Amsler grid every day to monitor your vision. One is below for you to use.

Here is how to use the Amsler grid:

  • Keep the Amsler grid in a place where you see it every day. Many people keep an Amsler grid on their refrigerator door or on their bathroom mirror.
  • In good light, look at the grid from about 12–15 inches away. Be sure to wear your reading glasses if you normally use them.
  • Cover one eye. Look directly at the dot in the center of the grid with your uncovered eye. Notice if any of the lines look bent or wavy. See if any part of the grid looks blurry, dim, or out of shape.
  • Now cover your other eye and test your vision this same way again.
This is what an Amsler grid might look like with blurry, wavy lines, or dim areas.

faq

Cataracts

How much does Cataract Surgery Costs?

Cataract surgery costs are generally covered by Medicare if you are Medicare eligible. Private insurance usually covers cataract surgery as well. Medicare will cover your costs if your vision tests at a certain level of acuity or clarity. Private insurance plans may have similar vision requirements. If your surgery is covered you may still have some costs. Special types of IOLs will cost more. Choosing to have cataract surgery before your vision has deteriorated enough will cost more. In certain cases, it might be possible to get coverage before you meet the age or vision requirements. Talk with your ophthalmologist if you are considering having early cataract surgery. What do you do if you don't have Medicare or private insurance coverage? You may still be able to reduce and manage the cost of cataract surgery. Ask about payment plans through your doctor's office. See if your employer offers flexible spending accounts that can help. Your ophthalmologist can help you learn more about costs of cataract surgery. Discuss your options for affording the procedure.

What Causes Cataracts?

Aging is the most common cause. This is due to normal eye changes that begin to happen after age 40. That is when normal proteins in the lens start to break down. This is what causes the lens to get cloudy. People over age 60 usually start to have some clouding of their lenses. However, vision problems may not happen until years later.

Other reasons you may get cataracts include:

  • having parents, brothers, sisters, or other family members who have cataracts
  • having certain medical problems, such as diabetes smoking
  • having had an eye injury, eye surgery, or radiation treatments on your upper body
  • having spent a lot of time in the sun, especially without sunglasses that protect your eyes from damaging ultraviolet (UV) rays
  • using certain medications such as corticosteroids, which may cause early formation of cataracts.

Most age-related cataracts develop gradually. Other cataracts can develop more quickly, such as those in younger people or those in people with diabetes. Doctors cannot predict how quickly a person’s cataract will develop.

 

What Is Monovision?

What is a YAG posterior capsulotomy for secondary cataracts?

Posterior capsulotomy is laser surgery you might need sometime after cataract surgery. It helps you see clearly if your vision becomes cloudy again. When you have cataract surgery, your ophthalmologist removes your eye's cloudy lens. They replace it with a clear, artificial intraocular lens (IOL). The IOL is held in place in the eye’s natural lens capsule. Weeks, months or years later, this capsule can become cloudy or wrinkled, causing blurry vision. This is called a posterior capsule opacification (PCO). It’s also sometimes called a "secondary cataract" or "scar tissue." With posterior capsulotomy, a laser is used to make an opening in the cloudy capsule. This allows light to pass through again for clear vision.

 

What Happens During Posterior Capsulotomy?

The procedure is done in your ophthalmologist's office. It only takes about 5 minutes. Here is what will happen:

  • Committed to taking care of patients in a personalized way
  • Your eye will be numbed with eye drops. You may be given other eye drops as well to dilate your pupil.
  • Your ophthalmologist will point a special laser at the back of the lens capsule and make a small opening.
  • After the procedure, usually you can do all your normal daily activities, including driving. Your ophthalmologist will tell you if there are things you should not do right after surgery.
  • You may need to use eye-drop medicine for one week after the surgery. Your ophthalmologist will let you know if this is necessary.
  • If you have no other eye problems affecting your vision, your sight should improve in about 24 hours.

What Are the Risks of Posterior Capsulotomy?

As with any surgery, there are possible risks and complications with posterior capsulotomy. Here are some of them:

  • You may have a detached retina (where the tissue lifts from the back of your eye). You may see what looks like a gray curtain moving across your field of vision. You might also see a lot of floaters. You should call your ophthalmologist immediately if this happens to your vision.
  • The pressure in your eye may increase.
  • The IOL might move through the posterior capsule opening.
  • You may have swelling in your eye, and you may need steroid eye drops.

faq

Types of Glaucoma

What kind of glaucoma do I have?

Primary open-angle glaucoma

This is the most common type of glaucoma. It happens gradually, where the eye does not drain fluid as well as it should (like a clogged drain). As a result, eye pressure builds and starts to damage the optic nerve. This type of glaucoma is painless and causes no vision changes at first. Some people can have optic nerves that are sensitive to normal eye pressure. This means their risk of getting glaucoma is higher than normal. Regular eye exams are important to find early signs of damage to their optic nerve.

Angle-closure glaucoma (also called “closed-angle glaucoma” or “narrow-angle glaucoma”)

This type happens when someone’s iris is very close to the drainage angle in their eye. The iris can end up blocking the drainage angle. You can think of it like a piece of paper sliding over a sink drain. When the drainage angle gets completely blocked, eye pressure rises very quickly. This is called an acute attack. It is a true eye emergency, and you should call your ophthalmologist right away or you might go blind. Here are the signs of an acute angle-closure glaucoma attack:

  • Your vision is suddenly blurry
  • You have severe eye pain
  • You have a headache
  • You feel sick to your stomach (nausea)
  • You throw up (vomit)
  • You see rainbow-colored rings or halos around lights

Many people with angle-closure glaucoma develop it slowly. This is called chronic angle-closure glaucoma. There are no symptoms at first, so they don’t know they have it until the damage is severe or they have an attack. Angle-closure glaucoma can cause blindness if not treated right away.

what is a YAG peripheral iridotomy (PI) for Narrow Angle?

What is a YAG PI? (Laser Iridotomy)
Laser iridotomy is a procedure to create a small hole in the colored part of the eye, called the iris, with a laser. This procedure helps treat or prevent angle-closure glaucoma. Glaucoma is an eye disease in which the nerve that carries visual messages to the brain (optic nerve) is damaged. This is usually caused by high pressure inside the eye. Damage to the optic nerve can cause a permanent loss of vision. Glaucoma needs to be diagnosed and treated early to prevent blindness. Normally, the fluid in the front of the eye is constantly flowing from where it is formed (the ciliary body) to the front of the eye. This fluid nourishes your eye and helps to keep its shape. The area between the iris (colored part of the eye) and the cornea (the clear outer layer on the front of the eye) is called the angle. Fluid drains out through the angle, into drainage channels, and is then reabsorbed by the body. When fluid flows out too slowly, eye pressure builds up.In angle-closure glaucoma or attack, the angle between the iris and the cornea is blocked or narrowed. When this happens, fluid is not able to drain from the eye. This can cause a pressure buildup.

When is it used?

Laser iridotomy helps restore the proper flow of fluid in the eye and reduce eye pressure. In most cases, this laser operation can successfully control eye pressure and preserve your vision. Without the procedure, you could permanently lose your vision. If you have had an attack of angle-closure glaucoma, you may be in pain and may have nausea and vomiting in addition to sudden loss of vision. The iridotomy is done as an emergency procedure in these cases. This procedure is also done in some people who are at high risk for getting angle-closure glaucoma. You may be at high risk if:

  • You have narrow angles (where fluid flows out of the eye).
  • You have had an attack of angle-closure glaucoma in one of your eyes but not the other.

How do I prepare for this procedure?

No special preparation is necessary. You may drive yourself to the appointment, and home after the procedure. Some patients prefer to bring a family member along, but this is not necessary.

What happens after the procedure?

The provider will remove the contact lens. Your eye will be rinsed out with some saline, and you will have you eye pressure checked about 15 to 20 minutes after the procedure. If this was an emergency procedure, it may take some time for your vision to return to its previous level and for the eye pressure to come back to a more normal level. In rare cases, another surgery is needed to control the eye pressure. You will need a follow-up appointment to check your eye pressure and the results of the procedure. You may need to have the same laser procedure in the other eye to prevent angle closure.

What are the risks of this procedure?

Your healthcare provider will explain the procedure and any risks. In general, the risks of laser iridotomy are small compared to its potential benefit. Some possible risks include:
  • It is possible, but very unlikely to develop a corneal scar and cataract after any laser procedure, which could limit your vision.
  • The eye pressure can go up in some people, but this is usually temporary.
  • Rarely, people develop blurry vision, double vision, or problems with glare after this procedure.

Every procedure or treatment has risks. Ask your healthcare provider how these risks apply to you. Be sure to discuss any other questions or concerns that you may have.

testimonials

what our clients say

Health Grades

I arrived at the office, signed in and took a seat. They called my name a few minutes later. A skilled technician performed the usual tests, i.e., a vision test and eye pressures. I was taken to Dr. Champion's examination room. Soon, another technician checked my eye pressures. After a short wait, Dr. Champion arrived. She examined my eyes with a bright light and magnification. She also checked my eye pressures, which were good. Essentially, no appreciable change in pressures or changes inside my eyes. As usual, I felt the knowledge, care and accuracy of the examinations were excellent. It was a good visit.

Steve Combs

Dr. Champion did my cataract surgery two years ago. Fantastic experience.

Wally Sears

Outstanding experience. Both Dr Champion and her staff were friendly & experienced. I highly recommend

Vitals

Attentive, good bed side manners, and she has great attention to detail . Stays with it until she gets the best results. I would trust her with my eyesight without hesitation.

Health Grades

Consultation and post-surgery exams excellent. Dr. Champion's staff are extremely nice as well. Very, very glad I had her do my laser cataract surgery on each eye. My new lenses/vision is absolutely beautiful and continuing to improve. Thank You, Dr. Champion!

Health Grades

I’ve been a patient of Dr. Champion for many years. I see her 3-4 times per year.I feel we’ve developed a relationship whereby I have 100% confidence in her abilities and what she tells me.

Health Grades

I wouldn't exchange my doctor for anyone else. She is thorough, patient minded, and shows genuine concern for my welfare. She explains in simplistic terms that i can understand the edications use and desired expectation. With regards the surgery my vision improved beyond compare. Her team of helpers show professionalism at it's highest degree.

Health Grades

I have been going to Dr Champion for years. She is not only an excellent doctor. She is also a genuinely kind and good person.

HealthGrades

I’ve been a patient of Dr. Champion for many years. She is an excellent ophthalmologist, very personable and explains her findings very thoroughly. The office is efficient. Patients are seen promptly. I’m very pleased with the care I receive. I trust Dr Lenka Champion, MD. She is also Board Certified. That is also important to me.

Timothy Stewart

Attentive, good bed side manners, and she has great attention to detail . Stays with it until she gets the best results. I would trust her with my eyesight without hesitation.

June McGrath

Dr Champion is our opthamologist and so happy she is. I trust her and glad she is now located i Jacksonville Beach.

WebMd

Dr. Champion performed cataract surgery on both my eyes. I am delighted with the results. No more glasses after wearing them for 60+yrs. In addition, she is a friendly and confident person. I have been blessed by this experience.
essed by this experience.

health grades

Dr. Champion has been my ophthalmologist for over 10 years. She is an excellent physician and has treated me with the upmost respect and professionalism starting with my first visit. She is kind and considerate and makes me feel more like a welcomed individual instead of just another patient. She is never to busy to answer my questions and always try to reassure me when I am a little  anxious about what is going on with my eyes. The entire staff at Eye Consultant always conduct themselves in a very professional manner. And the technicians make a point of knowing you by name!

 

David Mackendrick

I arrived a few minutes before my appointment and was greeted courteous and professionally by staff members .Before meeting the doctor I was taken back for specific testing for my eye exam ,he the Doctor was very thorough ,friendly and professional, he went about his tasks ,while keeping me informed and also giving me the opportunity ask questions. Me made me feel comfortable and gave me answers to my questions. I highly recommend Champion Eye .I had a great experience and know they my eye care is in the hands of someone I trust.

HealthGrades

I’ve been a patient of  Dr. Champion for many years. She is an excellent ophthalmologist, very personable and explains her findings very thoroughly. The office is efficient. Patients are seen promptly. I’m very pleased with the care I receive.

Susan Hamilton

I have been a patient of Dr. Champion for years, as was my mother. She is TERRIFIC!

Fatima H

Dr. Champion did my father's cataract surgery. She was able to manage a very high anxiety patient with other systemic issues, and seamlessly guided him through the cataract surgical process. He is beyond happy with his 'new eyes' and will only see Dr. Champion from now on. Thank you!

vitals

They call her champion for a reason. highly competent technically with a wonderful warm manner. She inspires trust an the results of her work are wonderful.

Health Grades

Dr. Champion has been my ophthalmologist for over 10 years. She is an excellent physician and has treated me with the upmost respect and professionalism starting with my first visit. She is kind and considerate and makes me feel more like a welcomed individual instead of just another patient. She is never to busy to answer my questions and always try to reassure me when I am a little anxious about what is going on with my eyes. The entire staff at Nicoltz Eye Consultant always conduct themselves in a very professional manner. And the technicians make a point of knowing you by name!

J. Martin

She is very caring and patient. My husband and I like her very much. She spends lots of time with each patient and is very through. She and her assistant work very well together.

Abbie Corbitt

Dr  Champion has been treating me for over 10 years. She is an expert in her field and has always shown deep care and concern for not only my physical health but genuinely showed concern for my emotional well-being. These days this is the exception to the rule! I highly recommend her. You won’t be sorry.

Timothy Stewart

I arrived a few minutes before my appointment and was greeted courteous and professionally by staff members. Before meeting the doctor I was taken back for specific testing for my eye exam ,the Doctor was very thorough ,friendly and professional, he went about his tasks ,while keeping me informed and also giving me the opportunity ask questions. Me made me feel comfortable and gave me answers to my questions. I highly recommend Champion Eye . I had a great experience and know they my eye care is in the hands of someone I trust.

we will help you achieve and maintain optimal vision.

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